Open Greek and Latin workshop

This year’s European Summer School in Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig will offer an Open Greek and Latin workshop! The goal of the Open Greek and Latin workshop is to teach basic and advanced tools for dealing with Greek and Latin in a digital environment. Participants can attend both courses or just one of them according to their interests and needs. Block 1 (5 days = 16 hrs) EpiDoc and CTS/CITE Architecture (Monica Berti and Simona Stoyanova) This block will be devoted to introducing EpiDoc, which is a subset of the TEI XML standard for encoding scholarly and educational editions of ancient documents. Participants will learn to work with inscriptions and manuscripts, and a special focus will be given to print collections of fragmentary works. The block will also introduce the CTS/CITE Architecture for producing canonical references to ancient documents. Block 2 (5 days = 16 hrs) Linguistic annotations (Giuseppe Celano) The aim of this block is to introduce participants to linguistic annotations of ancient texts by learning how to encode the morphological, syntactic, and lexical information of sentences in Greek and Latin texts. The work will be based on the ancient languages dependency treebanks developed by the Perseus Project.   Come join...

The Word from Thucydides

While moving forward with treebanking and aligning translations of the text of Thucydides, we created a quick list on Memrise so that those of us with less knowledge of Greek could keep memorizing vocabulary while contributing annotation! Although we plan for our own digital resources to be more specifically tailored to the context of historical languages, many wonderful sites exist as short-term and supplemental support for students. For those interested in more drills for Thucydides’ text, two other customized vocabulary lists exist on Memrise here and here– you can also check out the resources on Quizlet. And of course, the full English text of Professor Gregory Crane’s book on Thucydides is available...

CALL FOR COLLABORATION: Could you help us quantify the total number of students studying Latin and Ancient Greek in the world?

Authored and posted by Emily Franzini. So, I recently set out on a mission – thinking it would be relatively easy – to quantify the total number of people currently studying Latin and Ancient Greek at secondary and higher level education. I started with Europe, though fancying a bit of a data challenge, I soon expanded my research to the whole world. Well, it has been no easy task. That’s why it is not finished yet, and I still need all the help I can get. As the Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig, my team is interested in knowing how many of our Classics peers there are out there and how many would benefit from some of the eLearning tools we are currently developing. I thought it would be a simple question of looking up the national education statistics in each country, and voilà, I’d discover how many still study what was not so long ago considered, at least in the case of Latin, the universal academic language. How naïve! Apparently, national statistics centres have very little interest in knowing which subjects their young ones are studying. So, I began with emails: emails to the various ministries of education, emails to the Classics  associations, emails to university professors, university departments and Classics forums. For now, I will focus on secondary school enrolments for two reasons. First, secondary school enrolments seem to account for the largest numbers of students. Second, higher education enrolments are often much more decentralised and more difficult to identify. Italy gave me the greatest satisfaction – it is after all, the cradle of...