Creative Commons translations from Greek and Latin into modern languages?

Posted by Greta Franzini (not authored). The Open Philology project is looking for ways to encourage the distribution of translations from Greek and Latin into modern languages. Many authors are simply happy to put their materials on their own websites. Our goal at this point is to elucidate some issues for those who want their materials to be more widely used and to gauge how many people might produce new materials if they had some sort of support. We see (at least) three topics for producers to consider: Making your materials available under a Creative Commons license: Many producers make their materials freely available on a website but do not include an explicit rights statement enabling third parties to make use of their work. This also prevents their work from having the impact that they often actually wish. There are various CC licenses to choose from. A CC-BY-ND-NC prevents anyone from modifying your work or using it for commercial purposes. Such a license is conservative and relatively easy to accept but a bolder approach, using a CC-BY-SA license, which allows for derivative works and for third-parties to include your work in a commercial service, makes it easier for your work to reach more people. The BY feature requires that you receive credit, while your original version can remain available as a point of reference. The SA feature means that anyone who modifies your work has to share the results — thus preventing a commercial enterprise from making a new version of what you have done and hiding it behind an exclusive subscription wall. Making your materials available in TEI XML:...

“digilibLT – a Digital Library of Late Latin Texts” by Prof. Maurizio Lana from Università del Piemonte Orientale (Italy)

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. When: Tuesday, May 20th from 9:15 to 10:45am  Where: University of Leipzig, Paulinum 801 The project digilibLT is planning to offer a complete database of late-antique Latin authors and works as well as an exhaustive canon. Access to the canon and the database is free. Search windows are designed to allow users to search either the entire collection of texts or selection of them (by author, period, or type text) or single authors and works. Texts can be downloaded freely, which will allow individual scholars to work on the areas of interest with maximum flexibility. Texts are codified according to the TEI coding standard. The canon lists the critical editions on which the digital text is based; if this is the case, it also lists deviations from the critical text. The website also includes short entries on late-antique authors and works, bibliographies, and  canon entries....

“Editing Texts in Context: Two Case Studies” by Prof. Neel D. Smith from College of the Holy Cross

Announcement posted and authored by Greta Franzini. When: Monday, May 19th from 3:15 to 4:45pm Where: University of Leipzig, Paulinum 801 The two presentations in this seminar will illustrate the methods used to create digital diplomatic editions taking account of how physical artifacts have transmitted the texts to us, and will show the kinds of results these editions can lead to. 1. An unpublished manuscript of Archimedes:  Bodmer 8.  Rebecca Finnigan (Holy Cross ’15). The manuscript tradition of Archimedes is minimal:  in addition to the famous palimpsest, all the known Greek manuscripts descend from a single source, now lost.  This presentation focuses on a sixteenth century manuscript of Archimedes photographed by the e-codices project, but never edited. Systematic comparison of the text with the collation of the major critical edition by Heiberg shows that, in contrast to accepted conclusions, Bodmer 8 cannot be an apograph from any known Greek manuscript of Archimedes.  The physical layout of the text, paleographic features of the main text, and evidence for how the text’s accompanying diagrams were produced all support the hypothesis that Bodmer 8 is a direct copy of a much older source, plausibly copied directly from the now lost Codex A, our earliest source for the works of antiquity’s greatest mathematician. 2. Reassessing Athenian Tribute.  Christine Bannan (Holy Cross ’14). One of the most important questions in classical Greek history is how the League of the Greeks, originally a defensive alliance to protect the allied Greek states from Persian aggression, evolved into an Athenian Empire with members paying mandatory tribute to Athens.  Literary sources are scant, but one vital series of documents are the inscriptions recording the...

Medioevo Europeo: workshop summary

Summary of a workshop attended by Greta Franzini. Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. Photo of Florence Greta’s own. On Monday 28th April I attended a Cost Action workshop in Florence entitled  Towards a Medieval Latin Digital Library – A “Medioevo Europeo”. The workshop invited scholars from different countries and backgrounds to talk about their digital libraries and databases in an effort to better understand what’s available on the web today and, more importantly, how we can join forces to make our collections more useful and usable. The workshop was led by Professor Agostino Paravicini Bagliani, whose foreword introduced the Cost Action working group responsible for the promotion of the interoperability between Medieval databases and textual corpora. During the morning session each guest presented his/her own database so as to set the scene for the afternoon discussion, where participants defined next steps towards an international collaboration.   Clemens Radl (München), MGH Digital Clemens works on the Monumenta Germaniae Historica, a corpus whose development began in 1826. To date, it contains  400 volumes of medieval Latin text as well as other relevant materials, including middle-high French, Icelandic and Greek texts. The corpus is not limited to modern Germany but has a European scope, with texts dating from 500-1500. It features both digital critical editions and scans of the original volumes. MGH provides HTML versions of the texts, which do not enhance the text in any way but nevertheless provide a digital version of the text upon which further work can build. The HTML text contains a number of OCR errors, which the project is currently reviewing and correcting. MGH focuses more on layout rather...