The German Science Foundation leads the way in the transition to Open Access

Post posted by Greta Franzini (not authored). The German Science Foundation leads the way in the transition to Open Access Gregory Crane Leipzig October 28, 2014 At Leipzig we are participating in a couple of proposals for the German Science Foundation Open Access program. Anyone interested in the future of academic publication might read through the request for proposals to see where Germany is going. This sort of activity makes it a real pleasure to be a professor here in Germany. The RFP as a whole can be accessed here. The opening paragraph reads: By providing this funding, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Re-search Foundation) aims to establish workable business models for the publication of academic and scientific Open Access monographs and series of monographs (individual works, collections and dissertations). Funding these formats in particular will help to ensure the more effective introduction of Open Access publication in those subject areas that tend to publish important research results in book form. The conditions for project implementation and the requirements for project results are well worth reading — they really point the way forward for those who wish to create a sustainable infrastructure for open publication. a) Conditions for project implementation The funding is intended for projects designed to develop, pilot and document in detail reusable and workable business models for the publication of Open Access monographs by individual researchers or groups of researchers.  Proposals must include an outline of the concrete collaboration between information institutions (libraries, data centres, media centres, etc.), authors and possibly also pub-lishers or similar organisations. This should involve the development of workable and efficient concepts for...

CSEL XML 2.0

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. The Open Greek and Latin project has released a new version of the TEI XML versions of public domain volumes from the Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum (CSEL). The new versions include the following: The reconstructed texts are now within div tags that contain the subtype “work”. The goal is that the reconstructed texts can thus be automatically separated from the introductions, textual notes, indices etc. The div tags containing individual works are marked and contain the subtype “work”. Where we have canonical identifiers, we also include those identifiers in the n attribute: e.g., The citations have been extracted and tagged in a step towards making these texts more deeply compatible with the Canonical Text Services Protocol Architecture. This involves choosing one citation scheme to provide the dominant hierarchy as div tags, with others schemes as milestone markers. The current texts have been compared against new OCR runs conducted with ABBYY Finereader. The results were compared with what we received from the Data Entry Contractor. The Data Entry Contractor was required to provide texts where at least 99% of characters in the OCR output for the reconstructed texts were correct. (The introductions, notes, indices etc. received TEI XML but the OCR-generated text was not corrected). Many of the remaining errors are now marked with sic tags and possible corrections from the alternate OCR marked with corr tags. Some errors remain (particularly on small words) but this is a first step. Before deciding on whether to solicit corrections from the community or to pay for a Data Entry firm to correct the identified errors, we...