Unlocking the Digital Humanities – lecture series by Tufts and Leipzig, also web cast

Unlocking the Digital Humanities http://tiny.cc/k8ad9x An Open Research Series organized by the Tufts Department of Classics and by the Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig. Talks will take place in Eaton Hall on the Medford Campus of Tufts University and in Paulinum 402 at the University of Leipzig. All talks will be broadcast as Google Hangouts and published on Youtube. The URLs for the Google Hangouts and for the Youtube recordings will be posted at http://tiny.cc/k8ad9x. Part 1. Introducing Digital Humanities What is digital humanities? Why does it matter to you? All humanities disciplines welcome. 29 Feb, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202 Language, Digital Philology and the Humanities in a Global Society. Gregory Crane, Winnick Family Chair and Professor of Classics, Tufts University; Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig 2 Mar, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202 Digital Humanities: Everything you wanted to know but haven’t yet asked. Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig 7 Mar, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202 Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods. Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig. Melinda Johnston, prev. Cartoon Specialist, National Library of New Zealand Part 2. Digital Humanities Showcase Ask the experts! Hear and discuss use-cases of recent DH research and teaching. 10 Mar, 4:00-5:00pm, Eaton 123 Valid and Verified Undergraduate Research. Christopher Blackwell, Forgione University Professor, Furman University Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Assistant Professor, Tufts University 14 Mar, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202 eLearning and Computational Language Research. Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, Leipzig 4 Apr, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202 Rediscovery of Postclassical Latin and European Culture. Neven Jovanovic, Associate Professor...

Topic Modelling of Historical Languages in R

Topic Modelling of Historical Languages in R By Thomas Köntges This is a quick note and introduction to topic-modelling historical languages in R and is intended to supplement three publications forthcoming in 2016: one for the AMPHORAE issue of the Melbourne Historical Journal; one for Alexandria: The Journal of National and International Library and Information Issues (currently under review), and one for DH2016. This blog entry also summarises some points I have made in several talks in the past few months about topic-modelling historical languages (including in my talk at the Analyzing Text Reuse at Scale / Working with Big Humanities Data  workshop during the DH Leipzig Workshop Week in December 2015). This blog is therefore intended as a short summary of some of the more important points previously made and in contrast to the specific applications covered in each of the articles it provides an overview of the subject. My work on topic-modelling did not start in Leipzig, rather, it was part of a project I worked on during my time as a research associate at the Victoria University of Wellington (VUW), New Zealand, in 2013: the Digital Colenso Project. Back then I thought that there was only one ideal number of topics for each corpus and I used Martin Ponweiser’s harmonic mean-method (see chapter 3.7.1 and 4.3.3 in his master’s thesis) to attempt to determine this ideal. Although this approach was useful, albeit slow, for the Digital Colenso Project, I now think that this assumption was wrong, because the ideal topic granularity depends more on the research question and use-case of the application of topic modelling to a certain corpus than on...