Digital Hill Project

The Digital Hill Project by Marcel Mernitz Reference: M. Mernitz. “The Digital Hill Project: Sources on the Revolt of Samos”. Digital Classics Online Bd. 2,3 (2016) This is a quick overview about the Digital Hill project, which is part of the Open Greek and Latin project at the Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig. When I started working on the project, the first step was to create a spreadsheet that gathered all sources mentioned by G.F. Hill (Sources for Greek History between the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, Oxford 1897) in his third chapter about the “Revolt of Samos”. The spreadsheet contains further information about each source, e.g. if an XML file already exists in one of our repositories and a link to it or a link to the new created XML file. Furthermore, any text left out by Hill has been stored in a separate column and the spreadsheet provides links to the treebanking and text alignment files I created for the project. The spreadsheet can be accessed via the following link: https://goo.gl/zEcevt There is a legend in column M that explains the coloured cells. As part of the project we have created a new repository on GitHub where all the XML and EpiDoc files of the project are stored. In the GitHubo repo it is possible to find the treebank and text alignment data and also the data for the web page. The link for this repository is: https://github.com/DigitalHill Speaking of the webpage, it is accessible online at http://digitalhill.github.io/ The results can be found in “Chapter III” –> “Revolt of Samos”. There are two subchapters...

Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age ST Lee Professorial Fellow Lectures Spring 2016

Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age – ST Lee Professorial Fellow Lectures – Spring 2016 Gregory Crane Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Digital Humanities University of Leipzig Professor of Classics Winnick Family Chair of Technology and Entrepreneurship Tufts University A programme of lectures and events around the UK sponsored by the School of Advanced Study, University of London. Tuesday, May 17, 17:30-19:30, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House 349: “Global Philology, Greco-Roman Studies, and Classics in the 21st Century,” round table with Imre Galambos, Eleanor Robson, Sarah Savant and Michael Willis. Friday, May 20, 16:00-17:30, University of Glasgow: “Europe, Europeana and the Greco-Roman World.” Monday, May 23, 13:00-14:00: Oxford University Faculty of Classics, first floor seminar room, Epigraphy Workshop: “What are the possibilities for epigraphic (and papyrological) sources in a digital age?” Tuesday, May 24, 14:00-16:00, Oxford University: Seminar, Main lecture theatre, Faculty of Classics: “What would a smart edition look like and why should we care?” Friday, May 27, 12:00-13:30, University of Manchester: Seminar, “Greek into Arabic, Arabic into Latin, and reinterpretation of what constitutes Western Civilization.” Tuesday, May 31, 5.30-6.30, Durham University,seminar room, Dept. of Classics and Ancient History “Digital Philology and Greco-Roman Culture as the grand challenge of Reception Studies.” Friday, June 3, 16:30-18:00, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House 234: “Philological Education and Citizenship in the 21st Century.” Queries to...

Call for Papers: Classical Philology goes digital. Working on textual phenomena of ancient texts (Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017)

Call for papers Workshop Classical Philology goes digital. Working on textual phenomena of ancient texts. University of Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017 Digital technologies continue to change our daily lives, including the way scholars work. As a result, the Classics are currently also subject to constant change. Having established itself as an important field in the scientific landscape, Digital Humanities (DH) research provides a number of new possibilities to scholars who deal with analyses and interpretations of ancient works. Greek and Latin texts become digitally available and searchable (editing, encoding), they can be analyzed to find certain structures (text-mining), and they can also be provided with metadata (annotation, linking, textual alignment), e.g. according to traditional commentaries to explain terms, vocabulary or syntactic relationships (in particular tree-banking) for intra- and intertextual linking as well as for connections with research literature. Therefore, an important keyword in this is ‘networking,’ because there is so much potential for Classical Philology to collaborate with the Digital Humanities in creating useful tools for textual work, that a clear overview is difficult to obtain. Moreover, this scientific interest is by no means unilateral: Collaboration is very important for Digital Humanities as a way of (further) developing and testing digital methods. This is exactly where the proposed workshop comes in: representing several academic disciplines and institutions, scholars will come together to talk about their projects. We have invited Digital Humanists to the discussion who have experience pertaining to special issues in Classical Philology and can present the methods and potentials of their research (including the AvH Chair of DH / Leipzig, the CCeH, the DAI and Dariah-DE). In order to enable intensive and efficient work involving the various ideas and projects, the workshop is aimed at philologists whose...

Digital humanities enhanced. Challenges and prospects of Ancient Studies. A retrospect on the DH-conference in November 2015 in Leipzig

We are very happy to publish the report that Julia Jushaninowa has written about DHEgypt2015 (Altertumswissenschaften in a Digital Age: Egyptology, Papyrology and Beyond – Leipzig, November 4-6, 2015): Digital humanities enhanced. Challenges and prospects of Ancient Studies. A retrospect on the DH-conference in November 2015 in Leipzig by Julia Jushaninowa...

Unlocking the Digital Humanities – lecture series by Tufts and Leipzig, also web cast

Unlocking the Digital Humanities http://tiny.cc/k8ad9x An Open Research Series organized by the Tufts Department of Classics and by the Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig. Talks will take place in Eaton Hall on the Medford Campus of Tufts University and in Paulinum 402 at the University of Leipzig. All talks will be broadcast as Google Hangouts and published on Youtube. The URLs for the Google Hangouts and for the Youtube recordings will be posted at http://tiny.cc/k8ad9x. Part 1. Introducing Digital Humanities What is digital humanities? Why does it matter to you? All humanities disciplines welcome. 29 Feb, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202 Language, Digital Philology and the Humanities in a Global Society. Gregory Crane, Winnick Family Chair and Professor of Classics, Tufts University; Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig 2 Mar, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202 Digital Humanities: Everything you wanted to know but haven’t yet asked. Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig 7 Mar, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202 Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods. Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig. Melinda Johnston, prev. Cartoon Specialist, National Library of New Zealand Part 2. Digital Humanities Showcase Ask the experts! Hear and discuss use-cases of recent DH research and teaching. 10 Mar, 4:00-5:00pm, Eaton 123 Valid and Verified Undergraduate Research. Christopher Blackwell, Forgione University Professor, Furman University Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Assistant Professor, Tufts University 14 Mar, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202 eLearning and Computational Language Research. Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, Leipzig 4 Apr, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202 Rediscovery of Postclassical Latin and European Culture. Neven Jovanovic, Associate Professor...