The German Science Foundation leads the way in the transition to Open Access

Post posted by Greta Franzini (not authored). The German Science Foundation leads the way in the transition to Open Access Gregory Crane Leipzig October 28, 2014 At Leipzig we are participating in a couple of proposals for the German Science Foundation Open Access program. Anyone interested in the future of academic publication might read through the request for proposals to see where Germany is going. This sort of activity makes it a real pleasure to be a professor here in Germany. The RFP as a whole can be accessed here. The opening paragraph reads: By providing this funding, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Re-search Foundation) aims to establish workable business models for the publication of academic and scientific Open Access monographs and series of monographs (individual works, collections and dissertations). Funding these formats in particular will help to ensure the more effective introduction of Open Access publication in those subject areas that tend to publish important research results in book form. The conditions for project implementation and the requirements for project results are well worth reading — they really point the way forward for those who wish to create a sustainable infrastructure for open publication. a) Conditions for project implementation The funding is intended for projects designed to develop, pilot and document in detail reusable and workable business models for the publication of Open Access monographs by individual researchers or groups of researchers.  Proposals must include an outline of the concrete collaboration between information institutions (libraries, data centres, media centres, etc.), authors and possibly also pub-lishers or similar organisations. This should involve the development of workable and efficient concepts for...

CSEL XML 2.0

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. The Open Greek and Latin project has released a new version of the TEI XML versions of public domain volumes from the Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum (CSEL). The new versions include the following: The reconstructed texts are now within div tags that contain the subtype “work”. The goal is that the reconstructed texts can thus be automatically separated from the introductions, textual notes, indices etc. The div tags containing individual works are marked and contain the subtype “work”. Where we have canonical identifiers, we also include those identifiers in the n attribute: e.g., The citations have been extracted and tagged in a step towards making these texts more deeply compatible with the Canonical Text Services Protocol Architecture. This involves choosing one citation scheme to provide the dominant hierarchy as div tags, with others schemes as milestone markers. The current texts have been compared against new OCR runs conducted with ABBYY Finereader. The results were compared with what we received from the Data Entry Contractor. The Data Entry Contractor was required to provide texts where at least 99% of characters in the OCR output for the reconstructed texts were correct. (The introductions, notes, indices etc. received TEI XML but the OCR-generated text was not corrected). Many of the remaining errors are now marked with sic tags and possible corrections from the alternate OCR marked with corr tags. Some errors remain (particularly on small words) but this is a first step. Before deciding on whether to solicit corrections from the community or to pay for a Data Entry firm to correct the identified errors, we...

Latin and Greek Texts: What Are We Reading in Schools and Universities?

Research post authored and posted by Emily Franzini. School and university curricula love Homer. This is a fact. You don’t need to be a student of Classics to know who Homer was and what he wrote. Even Hollywood is familiar with his Iliad and Odyssey. What we’re interested in finding out, however, is who else and what else we are reading during our Latin and Ancient Greek lessons, and furthermore, if every country studies the same texts. To this end, we picked a sample of six countries, each boasting a relatively high number of students taking these subjects at various levels of proficiency. These are the USA, the UK, Germany, Croatia, Italy and Austria. For each we visited their Ministry of Education websites, secondary school examination board websites and many university Classics departmental pages. We emailed and waited. At last, we were able to compile a list of the top most read authors for each of these countries. Though fully aware that the information we gathered is only part of the puzzle, we also chose to make one list of the top three authors of Latin, and top three of Greek across all countries considered. Here is what we found: in first and second place for Greek, was, of course, the beloved Homer – his epic poems narrating the events of the Trojan War and the return of Odysseus to Ithaca being favourites among readers; in third place we have the Histories by Herodotus – considered by many the founding work of history. For Latin the first place is awarded to Vergil’s Aeneid recounting the adventures of Aeneas following the war of Troy; second place goes to Catullus’ Poems about his...

Book Scanning Contract

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. The Open Greek and Latin Project has recently signed a contract with the Saxon State and University Library Dresden (SLUB) to scan books dating between 1922-1984*. In particular, we are digitising editions that are in the public domain under European law. The EU allows its state members to assert copyright protection over scholarly editions for up to 30 years after publication. The argument has been made that an edition’s critical apparatus constitutes a separate work. In light of this debate and of all applicable copyright regulations, we have adopted the following strategy: Editions published after 1922 whose editor(s) died before or during 1943 are being digitised in full (reconstructed text and critical apparatus). Editions published after 1922 whose editor(s) died after 1943 are only partially digitised (reconstructed text only). The contract runs until the end of 2014 so we need to be selective. While starting, of course, with Lipsiae: Teubner editions, our list will extend to other series. SLUB scans will be added to SLUB’s digital collection and will ultimately be ingested in the Deutsche Digitale Bibliothek. Please address any comments, suggestions or questions to Greta Franzini at franzini(at)informatik(dot)uni-leipzig(dot)de ===================================== *Most editions predating 1922 have already been digitised and are available online via the HathiTrust Digital Library and...

Thank you for your feedback!

Authored and posted by Emily Franzini. The Historical Languages eLearning Project would like to extend a warm thank you to all of you who came to the Lange Nacht der Wissenschaften to learn and play with Ancient Geek. Your feedback was invaluable and has helped us bring our research and development to the next level!                ...