Medioevo Europeo: workshop summary

Summary of a workshop attended by Greta Franzini. Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. Photo of Florence Greta’s own. On Monday 28th April I attended a Cost Action workshop in Florence entitled  Towards a Medieval Latin Digital Library – A “Medioevo Europeo”. The workshop invited scholars from different countries and backgrounds to talk about their digital libraries and databases in an effort to better understand what’s available on the web today and, more importantly, how we can join forces to make our collections more useful and usable. The workshop was led by Professor Agostino Paravicini Bagliani, whose foreword introduced the Cost Action working group responsible for the promotion of the interoperability between Medieval databases and textual corpora. During the morning session each guest presented his/her own database so as to set the scene for the afternoon discussion, where participants defined next steps towards an international collaboration.   Clemens Radl (München), MGH Digital Clemens works on the Monumenta Germaniae Historica, a corpus whose development began in 1826. To date, it contains  400 volumes of medieval Latin text as well as other relevant materials, including middle-high French, Icelandic and Greek texts. The corpus is not limited to modern Germany but has a European scope, with texts dating from 500-1500. It features both digital critical editions and scans of the original volumes. MGH provides HTML versions of the texts, which do not enhance the text in any way but nevertheless provide a digital version of the text upon which further work can build. The HTML text contains a number of OCR errors, which the project is currently reviewing and correcting. MGH focuses more on layout rather...

CSEL is now on GitHub!

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. We’re really proud to announce that EpiDoc XML versions of the monumental Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum (CSEL) are now being added to the Open Greek and Latin Project‘s GitHub repository! We are in the process of digitising the public domain volumes of CSEL — you can the volumes with which we are beginning at http://www.roger-pearse.com/weblog/2009/10/24/list-of-csel-volumes-at-google-books/. The Latin text was OCR-ed, corrected (at 99% accuracy) and encoded according to our specifications by French Data Entry company Jouve. CSEL is the first in a line of texts Jouve is currently helping us digitise. Each XML file is available under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License and contains a link to the Archive.org scan it was taken from. An accuracy of 99% means that there are plenty of data entry errors to be fixed. Similarly, our basic CTS-compliant EpiDoc markup is waiting to be further enriched.  The raw text was annotated by operators with no knowledge of Latin nor Greek, so a lot can –and should– be done to improve the XML. So come and help us out! Feel free to download, modify, improve and share this work with friends and colleagues. The more, the merrier!    ...

Open Greek and Latin workshop

This year’s European Summer School in Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig will offer an Open Greek and Latin workshop! The goal of the Open Greek and Latin workshop is to teach basic and advanced tools for dealing with Greek and Latin in a digital environment. Participants can attend both courses or just one of them according to their interests and needs. Block 1 (5 days = 16 hrs) EpiDoc and CTS/CITE Architecture (Monica Berti and Simona Stoyanova) This block will be devoted to introducing EpiDoc, which is a subset of the TEI XML standard for encoding scholarly and educational editions of ancient documents. Participants will learn to work with inscriptions and manuscripts, and a special focus will be given to print collections of fragmentary works. The block will also introduce the CTS/CITE Architecture for producing canonical references to ancient documents. Block 2 (5 days = 16 hrs) Linguistic annotations (Giuseppe Celano) The aim of this block is to introduce participants to linguistic annotations of ancient texts by learning how to encode the morphological, syntactic, and lexical information of sentences in Greek and Latin texts. The work will be based on the ancient languages dependency treebanks developed by the Perseus Project.   Come join...

The Word from Thucydides

While moving forward with treebanking and aligning translations of the text of Thucydides, we created a quick list on Memrise so that those of us with less knowledge of Greek could keep memorizing vocabulary while contributing annotation! Although we plan for our own digital resources to be more specifically tailored to the context of historical languages, many wonderful sites exist as short-term and supplemental support for students. For those interested in more drills for Thucydides’ text, two other customized vocabulary lists exist on Memrise here and here– you can also check out the resources on Quizlet. And of course, the full English text of Professor Gregory Crane’s book on Thucydides is available...

CALL FOR COLLABORATION: Could you help us quantify the total number of students studying Latin and Ancient Greek in the world?

Authored and posted by Emily Franzini. So, I recently set out on a mission – thinking it would be relatively easy – to quantify the total number of people currently studying Latin and Ancient Greek at secondary and higher level education. I started with Europe, though fancying a bit of a data challenge, I soon expanded my research to the whole world. Well, it has been no easy task. That’s why it is not finished yet, and I still need all the help I can get. As the Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig, my team is interested in knowing how many of our Classics peers there are out there and how many would benefit from some of the eLearning tools we are currently developing. I thought it would be a simple question of looking up the national education statistics in each country, and voilà, I’d discover how many still study what was not so long ago considered, at least in the case of Latin, the universal academic language. How naïve! Apparently, national statistics centres have very little interest in knowing which subjects their young ones are studying. So, I began with emails: emails to the various ministries of education, emails to the Classics  associations, emails to university professors, university departments and Classics forums. For now, I will focus on secondary school enrolments for two reasons. First, secondary school enrolments seem to account for the largest numbers of students. Second, higher education enrolments are often much more decentralised and more difficult to identify. Italy gave me the greatest satisfaction – it is after all, the cradle of...