Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age ST Lee Professorial Fellow Lectures Spring 2016

Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age – ST Lee Professorial Fellow Lectures – Spring 2016 Gregory Crane Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Digital Humanities University of Leipzig Professor of Classics Winnick Family Chair of Technology and Entrepreneurship Tufts University A programme of lectures and events around the UK sponsored by the School of Advanced Study, University of London. Tuesday, May 17, 17:30-19:30, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House 349: “Global Philology, Greco-Roman Studies, and Classics in the 21st Century,” round table with Imre Galambos, Eleanor Robson, Sarah Savant and Michael Willis. Friday, May 20, 16:00-17:30, University of Glasgow: “Europe, Europeana and the Greco-Roman World.” Monday, May 23, 13:00-14:00: Oxford University Faculty of Classics, first floor seminar room, Epigraphy Workshop: “What are the possibilities for epigraphic (and papyrological) sources in a digital age?” Tuesday, May 24, 14:00-16:00, Oxford University: Seminar, Main lecture theatre, Faculty of Classics: “What would a smart edition look like and why should we care?” Friday, May 27, 12:00-13:30, University of Manchester: Seminar, “Greek into Arabic, Arabic into Latin, and reinterpretation of what constitutes Western Civilization.” Tuesday, May 31, 5.30-6.30, Durham University,seminar room, Dept. of Classics and Ancient History “Digital Philology and Greco-Roman Culture as the grand challenge of Reception Studies.” Friday, June 3, 16:30-18:00, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House 234: “Philological Education and Citizenship in the 21st Century.” Queries to...

Call for Papers: Classical Philology goes digital. Working on textual phenomena of ancient texts (Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017)

Call for papers Workshop Classical Philology goes digital. Working on textual phenomena of ancient texts. University of Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017 Digital technologies continue to change our daily lives, including the way scholars work. As a result, the Classics are currently also subject to constant change. Having established itself as an important field in the scientific landscape, Digital Humanities (DH) research provides a number of new possibilities to scholars who deal with analyses and interpretations of ancient works. Greek and Latin texts become digitally available and searchable (editing, encoding), they can be analyzed to find certain structures (text-mining), and they can also be provided with metadata (annotation, linking, textual alignment), e.g. according to traditional commentaries to explain terms, vocabulary or syntactic relationships (in particular tree-banking) for intra- and intertextual linking as well as for connections with research literature. Therefore, an important keyword in this is ‘networking,’ because there is so much potential for Classical Philology to collaborate with the Digital Humanities in creating useful tools for textual work, that a clear overview is difficult to obtain. Moreover, this scientific interest is by no means unilateral: Collaboration is very important for Digital Humanities as a way of (further) developing and testing digital methods. This is exactly where the proposed workshop comes in: representing several academic disciplines and institutions, scholars will come together to talk about their projects. We have invited Digital Humanists to the discussion who have experience pertaining to special issues in Classical Philology and can present the methods and potentials of their research (including the AvH Chair of DH / Leipzig, the CCeH, the DAI and Dariah-DE). In order to enable intensive and efficient work involving the various ideas and projects, the workshop is aimed at philologists whose...

Digital humanities enhanced. Challenges and prospects of Ancient Studies. A retrospect on the DH-conference in November 2015 in Leipzig

We are very happy to publish the report that Julia Jushaninowa has written about DHEgypt2015 (Altertumswissenschaften in a Digital Age: Egyptology, Papyrology and Beyond – Leipzig, November 4-6, 2015): Digital humanities enhanced. Challenges and prospects of Ancient Studies. A retrospect on the DH-conference in November 2015 in Leipzig by Julia Jushaninowa...

Unlocking the Digital Humanities – lecture series by Tufts and Leipzig, also web cast

Unlocking the Digital Humanities http://tiny.cc/k8ad9x An Open Research Series organized by the Tufts Department of Classics and by the Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig. Talks will take place in Eaton Hall on the Medford Campus of Tufts University and in Paulinum 402 at the University of Leipzig. All talks will be broadcast as Google Hangouts and published on Youtube. The URLs for the Google Hangouts and for the Youtube recordings will be posted at http://tiny.cc/k8ad9x. Part 1. Introducing Digital Humanities What is digital humanities? Why does it matter to you? All humanities disciplines welcome. 29 Feb, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202 Language, Digital Philology and the Humanities in a Global Society. Gregory Crane, Winnick Family Chair and Professor of Classics, Tufts University; Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig 2 Mar, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202 Digital Humanities: Everything you wanted to know but haven’t yet asked. Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig 7 Mar, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202 Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods. Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig. Melinda Johnston, prev. Cartoon Specialist, National Library of New Zealand Part 2. Digital Humanities Showcase Ask the experts! Hear and discuss use-cases of recent DH research and teaching. 10 Mar, 4:00-5:00pm, Eaton 123 Valid and Verified Undergraduate Research. Christopher Blackwell, Forgione University Professor, Furman University Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Assistant Professor, Tufts University 14 Mar, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202 eLearning and Computational Language Research. Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, Leipzig 4 Apr, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202 Rediscovery of Postclassical Latin and European Culture. Neven Jovanovic, Associate Professor...

Seven reasons why we need an independent Digital Humanities

Gregory Crane Professor of Classics and Winnick Family Chair of Technology and Entrepreneurship Tufts University Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Digital Humanities Open Access Officer University of Leipzig April 28, 2015 Draft white paper available at http://goo.gl/V9Ddjq This paper describes two issues, the need for an independent Digital Humanities and the opportunity to rethink within a digital space the ways in which Humanists can contribute to society and redefine the social contract upon which they depend. The paper opens by articulating seven cognitive challenges that the Humanities can, in some cases only, and in other cases much more effectively, combat insofar as we have an independent Digital Humanities: (1) we assume that new research will look like research that we would like to do ourselves; (2) we assume that we should be able to exploit the results of new methods without having to learn much and without rethinking the skills that at least some senior members of our field must have; (3) we focus on the perceived quality of Digital Humanities work rather than the larger forces and processes now in play (which would only demand more and better Digital Humanities work if we do not like what we see); (4) we assume that we have already adapted new digital methods to existing departmental and disciplinary structures and assume that the rate of change over the next thirty years will be similar to, or even slower than, that we experienced in the past thirty years, rather than recognizing that the next step will be for us to adapt ourselves to exploit the digital space of which we are a part;...

Getting to open data for Classical Greek and Latin: breaking old habits and undoing the damage — a call for comment!

Gregory Crane Professor of Classics and Winnick Family Chair of Technology and Entrepreneurship Tufts University Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Digital Humanities Open Access Officer University of Leipzig March 4, 2015 Philologists must for at least two reasons open up the textual data upon which they base their work. First, researchers need to be able to download, modify and redistribute their textual data if they are to fully exploit both new methods that center around algorithmic analysis (e.g., corpus linguistics, computational linguistics, text mining, and various applications of machine learning) and new scholarly products and practices that computational methods enable (e.g., on-going and decentralized production of micro-publications by scholars from around the world, as well as scalable evaluation systems to facilitate contributions from, and learning by, citizen scientists). In some cases, issues of privacy may come into play (e.g., where we study Greek and Latin data produced by our students) but our textual editions of, and associated annotations on, long-dead authors do not fall into this category. Second, open data is essential if researchers working with historical languages such as Classical Greek and Latin are to realize either their obligation to conduct the most effective (as well as transparent) research and or their obligation to advance the role that those languages can play in the intellectual life of society as a whole. It is not enough to make our 100 EUR monographs available under an Open Access license. We must also make as accessible as possible the primary sources upon which those monographs depend. This blog post addresses two barriers that prevent students of historical languages such as Classical...