The German Science Foundation leads the way in the transition to Open Access

Post posted by Greta Franzini (not authored). The German Science Foundation leads the way in the transition to Open Access Gregory Crane Leipzig October 28, 2014 At Leipzig we are participating in a couple of proposals for the German Science Foundation Open Access program. Anyone interested in the future of academic publication might read through the request for proposals to see where Germany is going. This sort of activity makes it a real pleasure to be a professor here in Germany. The RFP as a whole can be accessed here. The opening paragraph reads: By providing this funding, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Re-search Foundation) aims to establish workable business models for the publication of academic and scientific Open Access monographs and series of monographs (individual works, collections and dissertations). Funding these formats in particular will help to ensure the more effective introduction of Open Access publication in those subject areas that tend to publish important research results in book form. The conditions for project implementation and the requirements for project results are well worth reading — they really point the way forward for those who wish to create a sustainable infrastructure for open publication. a) Conditions for project implementation The funding is intended for projects designed to develop, pilot and document in detail reusable and workable business models for the publication of Open Access monographs by individual researchers or groups of researchers.  Proposals must include an outline of the concrete collaboration between information institutions (libraries, data centres, media centres, etc.), authors and possibly also pub-lishers or similar organisations. This should involve the development of workable and efficient concepts for...

CSEL XML 2.0

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. The Open Greek and Latin project has released a new version of the TEI XML versions of public domain volumes from the Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum (CSEL). The new versions include the following: The reconstructed texts are now within div tags that contain the subtype “work”. The goal is that the reconstructed texts can thus be automatically separated from the introductions, textual notes, indices etc. The div tags containing individual works are marked and contain the subtype “work”. Where we have canonical identifiers, we also include those identifiers in the n attribute: e.g., The citations have been extracted and tagged in a step towards making these texts more deeply compatible with the Canonical Text Services Protocol Architecture. This involves choosing one citation scheme to provide the dominant hierarchy as div tags, with others schemes as milestone markers. The current texts have been compared against new OCR runs conducted with ABBYY Finereader. The results were compared with what we received from the Data Entry Contractor. The Data Entry Contractor was required to provide texts where at least 99% of characters in the OCR output for the reconstructed texts were correct. (The introductions, notes, indices etc. received TEI XML but the OCR-generated text was not corrected). Many of the remaining errors are now marked with sic tags and possible corrections from the alternate OCR marked with corr tags. Some errors remain (particularly on small words) but this is a first step. Before deciding on whether to solicit corrections from the community or to pay for a Data Entry firm to correct the identified errors, we...

Book Scanning Contract

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. The Open Greek and Latin Project has recently signed a contract with the Saxon State and University Library Dresden (SLUB) to scan books dating between 1922-1984*. In particular, we are digitising editions that are in the public domain under European law. The EU allows its state members to assert copyright protection over scholarly editions for up to 30 years after publication. The argument has been made that an edition’s critical apparatus constitutes a separate work. In light of this debate and of all applicable copyright regulations, we have adopted the following strategy: Editions published after 1922 whose editor(s) died before or during 1943 are being digitised in full (reconstructed text and critical apparatus). Editions published after 1922 whose editor(s) died after 1943 are only partially digitised (reconstructed text only). The contract runs until the end of 2014 so we need to be selective. While starting, of course, with Lipsiae: Teubner editions, our list will extend to other series. SLUB scans will be added to SLUB’s digital collection and will ultimately be ingested in the Deutsche Digitale Bibliothek. Please address any comments, suggestions or questions to Greta Franzini at franzini(at)informatik(dot)uni-leipzig(dot)de ===================================== *Most editions predating 1922 have already been digitised and are available online via the HathiTrust Digital Library and...

“digilibLT – a Digital Library of Late Latin Texts” by Prof. Maurizio Lana from Università del Piemonte Orientale (Italy)

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. When: Tuesday, May 20th from 9:15 to 10:45am  Where: University of Leipzig, Paulinum 801 The project digilibLT is planning to offer a complete database of late-antique Latin authors and works as well as an exhaustive canon. Access to the canon and the database is free. Search windows are designed to allow users to search either the entire collection of texts or selection of them (by author, period, or type text) or single authors and works. Texts can be downloaded freely, which will allow individual scholars to work on the areas of interest with maximum flexibility. Texts are codified according to the TEI coding standard. The canon lists the critical editions on which the digital text is based; if this is the case, it also lists deviations from the critical text. The website also includes short entries on late-antique authors and works, bibliographies, and  canon entries....

“Editing Texts in Context: Two Case Studies” by Prof. Neel D. Smith from College of the Holy Cross

Announcement posted and authored by Greta Franzini. When: Monday, May 19th from 3:15 to 4:45pm Where: University of Leipzig, Paulinum 801 The two presentations in this seminar will illustrate the methods used to create digital diplomatic editions taking account of how physical artifacts have transmitted the texts to us, and will show the kinds of results these editions can lead to. 1. An unpublished manuscript of Archimedes:  Bodmer 8.  Rebecca Finnigan (Holy Cross ’15). The manuscript tradition of Archimedes is minimal:  in addition to the famous palimpsest, all the known Greek manuscripts descend from a single source, now lost.  This presentation focuses on a sixteenth century manuscript of Archimedes photographed by the e-codices project, but never edited. Systematic comparison of the text with the collation of the major critical edition by Heiberg shows that, in contrast to accepted conclusions, Bodmer 8 cannot be an apograph from any known Greek manuscript of Archimedes.  The physical layout of the text, paleographic features of the main text, and evidence for how the text’s accompanying diagrams were produced all support the hypothesis that Bodmer 8 is a direct copy of a much older source, plausibly copied directly from the now lost Codex A, our earliest source for the works of antiquity’s greatest mathematician. 2. Reassessing Athenian Tribute.  Christine Bannan (Holy Cross ’14). One of the most important questions in classical Greek history is how the League of the Greeks, originally a defensive alliance to protect the allied Greek states from Persian aggression, evolved into an Athenian Empire with members paying mandatory tribute to Athens.  Literary sources are scant, but one vital series of documents are the inscriptions recording the...

CSEL is now on GitHub!

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. We’re really proud to announce that EpiDoc XML versions of the monumental Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum (CSEL) are now being added to the Open Greek and Latin Project‘s GitHub repository! We are in the process of digitising the public domain volumes of CSEL — you can the volumes with which we are beginning at http://www.roger-pearse.com/weblog/2009/10/24/list-of-csel-volumes-at-google-books/. The Latin text was OCR-ed, corrected (at 99% accuracy) and encoded according to our specifications by French Data Entry company Jouve. CSEL is the first in a line of texts Jouve is currently helping us digitise. Each XML file is available under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License and contains a link to the Archive.org scan it was taken from. An accuracy of 99% means that there are plenty of data entry errors to be fixed. Similarly, our basic CTS-compliant EpiDoc markup is waiting to be further enriched.  The raw text was annotated by operators with no knowledge of Latin nor Greek, so a lot can –and should– be done to improve the XML. So come and help us out! Feel free to download, modify, improve and share this work with friends and colleagues. The more, the merrier!    ...