Help sought with Metadata for the Open Patrologia Graeca Online

Gregory Crane Perseus Project and the Open Philology Project The University of Leipzig and Tufts University We are looking for help in preparing metadata for the Patrologia Graeca (PG) component of what we are calling the Open Migne Project, an attempt to make the most useful possible transcripts of the full Patrologia Graeca and Patrologia Latina freely available. Help can consist of proofreading, additional tagging, and checking the volume/column references to the actual PG. In particular, we would welcome seeing this data converted into a dynamic index into online copies of the PG in Archive.org, the HathiTrust, Google Books, or Europeana. For now, we make the working XML metadata document available on an as-is basis. More...

Book Scanning Contract

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. The Open Greek and Latin Project has recently signed a contract with the Saxon State and University Library Dresden (SLUB) to scan books dating between 1922-1984*. In particular, we are digitising editions that are in the public domain under European law. The EU allows its state members to assert copyright protection over scholarly editions for up to 30 years after publication. The argument has been made that an edition’s critical apparatus constitutes a separate work. In light of this debate and of all applicable copyright regulations, we have adopted the following strategy: Editions published after 1922 whose editor(s) died before or during 1943 are being digitised in full (reconstructed text and critical apparatus). Editions published after 1922 whose editor(s) died after 1943 are only partially digitised (reconstructed text only). The contract runs until the end of 2014 so we need to be selective. While starting, of course, with Lipsiae: Teubner editions, our list will extend to other series. SLUB scans will be added to SLUB’s digital collection and will ultimately be ingested in the Deutsche Digitale Bibliothek. Please address any comments, suggestions or questions to Greta Franzini at franzini(at)informatik(dot)uni-leipzig(dot)de ===================================== *Most editions predating 1922 have already been digitised and are available online via the HathiTrust Digital Library and...

Different Cultures, Different Perceptions: HELP ME BY COMPLETING THIS SURVEY!

People from different cultures have different ideas about one single event, or even a historical figure in the ancient world. This may have an influence on how people interact while they are learning a historical language collaboratively. I am trying to understand if this hypothesis is true. HELP ME by completing this survey. Just click on the following link to participate in this study and I will be forever grateful!...

Creative Commons translations from Greek and Latin into modern languages?

Posted by Greta Franzini (not authored). The Open Philology project is looking for ways to encourage the distribution of translations from Greek and Latin into modern languages. Many authors are simply happy to put their materials on their own websites. Our goal at this point is to elucidate some issues for those who want their materials to be more widely used and to gauge how many people might produce new materials if they had some sort of support. We see (at least) three topics for producers to consider: Making your materials available under a Creative Commons license: Many producers make their materials freely available on a website but do not include an explicit rights statement enabling third parties to make use of their work. This also prevents their work from having the impact that they often actually wish. There are various CC licenses to choose from. A CC-BY-ND-NC prevents anyone from modifying your work or using it for commercial purposes. Such a license is conservative and relatively easy to accept but a bolder approach, using a CC-BY-SA license, which allows for derivative works and for third-parties to include your work in a commercial service, makes it easier for your work to reach more people. The BY feature requires that you receive credit, while your original version can remain available as a point of reference. The SA feature means that anyone who modifies your work has to share the results — thus preventing a commercial enterprise from making a new version of what you have done and hiding it behind an exclusive subscription wall. Making your materials available in TEI XML:...

CALL FOR COLLABORATION: Could you help us quantify the total number of students studying Latin and Ancient Greek in the world?

Authored and posted by Emily Franzini. So, I recently set out on a mission – thinking it would be relatively easy – to quantify the total number of people currently studying Latin and Ancient Greek at secondary and higher level education. I started with Europe, though fancying a bit of a data challenge, I soon expanded my research to the whole world. Well, it has been no easy task. That’s why it is not finished yet, and I still need all the help I can get. As the Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig, my team is interested in knowing how many of our Classics peers there are out there and how many would benefit from some of the eLearning tools we are currently developing. I thought it would be a simple question of looking up the national education statistics in each country, and voilà, I’d discover how many still study what was not so long ago considered, at least in the case of Latin, the universal academic language. How naïve! Apparently, national statistics centres have very little interest in knowing which subjects their young ones are studying. So, I began with emails: emails to the various ministries of education, emails to the Classics  associations, emails to university professors, university departments and Classics forums. For now, I will focus on secondary school enrolments for two reasons. First, secondary school enrolments seem to account for the largest numbers of students. Second, higher education enrolments are often much more decentralised and more difficult to identify. Italy gave me the greatest satisfaction – it is after all, the cradle of...
Latin Data Entry

Latin Data Entry

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. The Open Greek and Latin Project (OGL) recently signed a contract with Data Entry Company Jouve to OCR and encode Latin works and collections in accordance with the latest TEI EpiDoc standards. First on the to-do list is the monumental Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum (CSEL) and, in particular, the public domain (by European Law) volumes available here: once digitised and annotated, OGL will make these volumes freely available online for browsing and download. The contract doesn’t stop at CSEL so we’re currently busy at work discussing other items on our to-do list. We look forward to a long and fruitful...