Guests: Bruce Robertson & Federico Boschetti

Summary authored and posted by Greta Franzini Bruce Robertson and Federico Boschetti from Mount Allison University and CNRS Pisa respectively walked us through their work on OCR of Ancient Greek text. Bruce described some of the issues OCR engines face when scanning polytonic Greek (e.g. line segmentation), image requirements for optimal OCR scanning, spellchecking as well as his joint effort with Federico to combine results from different OCR engines in order to obtain the best possible output. Federico elaborated on the different correction and editing methodologies of OCR output, including crowd sourcing and data entry contracts. His introduction served to contextualise the OCR proof-reading tool (a web application) he has developed to help flag-up errors and suggest corrections. Federico Boschetti Bruce...

Guests: Gernot Höflechner, Robert Lichtensteiner & Christof Sirk

Gernot Höflechner, Robert Lichtensteiner and Christof Sirk from the University of Graz drove all the way from Austria to Leipzig to talk to us about their Latin Language Toolkit, a parser known as Prometheus. Built from scratch to avoid dependencies on external libraries and third parties, the tool tokenises and analyses text, colour coding parts of speech, identifying clauses and ultimately generating games and exercises for Latin students to use and play with as part of their language learning experience. While currently dealing with prose only, the intention is to extend Prometheus‘ functionality to Latin poetry as well. Once fully developed, Prometheus will be used to support Latin research and...

Guests: Neel Smith & Chris Blackwell

On 5th August Neel Smith and Chris Blackwell from Holy Cross College and Furman University gave us a presentation on the CTS/CITE Architecture they jointly developed to create comprehensive and searchable digital scholarly editions. Their work allows users to query textual data in the form of canonical citations, thus preserving humanistic tradition within emerging digital publication environments. The infinite possibilities and flexibility of this architecture make CTS and CITE an ideal publication standard for the Open Philology Project which is currently preparing the infrastructure required to encode and query all the Ancient Greek and Latin content it will make available under its Scaife Digital Library. For a quick guide on how to install the CTS/CITE Architecture on your machine, check out the instructions our student visitors from Croatia put together whilst in Leipzig. Thank you...

Guest: Monica Berti

On 2nd August Monica Berti from Tufts University and Università Roma Tor Vergata presented her work on Greek Fragmentary Texts and text re-use. Following an introduction on fragmentary authors and on the different meanings of fragmentum in classical scholarship, Monica went on to illustrate the challenges she faces when dealing with fragmentary authors in print editions and explain how the digital world can help us better contextualise fragments. Monica showed us her wonderful fragmentary text demo developed with Bridget Almas as part of the Perseids collaborative platform. Monica’s talk sparked a group discussion whereby we attempted to clarify how the DH Leipzig team might incorporate fragments into its Open Greek and Latin workflow (i.e. selection, digitisation and encoding of Ancient Greek...

Guest: Lieve Van Hoof

Summary authored and posted by Greta Franzini On 25th July Lieve van Hoof from the University of Ghent gave us a wonderful presentation on her work on the Greek sophist Libanius. Lieve is working towards a social network analysis of the largest surviving letter collection from Antiquity. In particular, she analyses people and place names in an effort to better understand relationships between individuals and locations in Ancient Greece and Rome. In order to advance to the next stage of her work, that is text encoding, Lieve needs clean Greek text. The Open Philology Project team has therefore digitised and is currently OCR scanning an out-of-copyright edition of Libanius so that Lieve can make progress on her work and DH Leipzig can use her project as a case study for its Digital Philology...