The German Science Foundation leads the way in the transition to Open Access

Post posted by Greta Franzini (not authored). The German Science Foundation leads the way in the transition to Open Access Gregory Crane Leipzig October 28, 2014 At Leipzig we are participating in a couple of proposals for the German Science Foundation Open Access program. Anyone interested in the future of academic publication might read through the request for proposals to see where Germany is going. This sort of activity makes it a real pleasure to be a professor here in Germany. The RFP as a whole can be accessed here. The opening paragraph reads: By providing this funding, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Re-search Foundation) aims to establish workable business models for the publication of academic and scientific Open Access monographs and series of monographs (individual works, collections and dissertations). Funding these formats in particular will help to ensure the more effective introduction of Open Access publication in those subject areas that tend to publish important research results in book form. The conditions for project implementation and the requirements for project results are well worth reading — they really point the way forward for those who wish to create a sustainable infrastructure for open publication. a) Conditions for project implementation The funding is intended for projects designed to develop, pilot and document in detail reusable and workable business models for the publication of Open Access monographs by individual researchers or groups of researchers.  Proposals must include an outline of the concrete collaboration between information institutions (libraries, data centres, media centres, etc.), authors and possibly also pub-lishers or similar organisations. This should involve the development of workable and efficient concepts for...

Book Scanning Contract

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. The Open Greek and Latin Project has recently signed a contract with the Saxon State and University Library Dresden (SLUB) to scan books dating between 1922-1984*. In particular, we are digitising editions that are in the public domain under European law. The EU allows its state members to assert copyright protection over scholarly editions for up to 30 years after publication. The argument has been made that an edition’s critical apparatus constitutes a separate work. In light of this debate and of all applicable copyright regulations, we have adopted the following strategy: Editions published after 1922 whose editor(s) died before or during 1943 are being digitised in full (reconstructed text and critical apparatus). Editions published after 1922 whose editor(s) died after 1943 are only partially digitised (reconstructed text only). The contract runs until the end of 2014 so we need to be selective. While starting, of course, with Lipsiae: Teubner editions, our list will extend to other series. SLUB scans will be added to SLUB’s digital collection and will ultimately be ingested in the Deutsche Digitale Bibliothek. Please address any comments, suggestions or questions to Greta Franzini at franzini(at)informatik(dot)uni-leipzig(dot)de ===================================== *Most editions predating 1922 have already been digitised and are available online via the HathiTrust Digital Library and...

Creative Commons translations from Greek and Latin into modern languages?

Posted by Greta Franzini (not authored). The Open Philology project is looking for ways to encourage the distribution of translations from Greek and Latin into modern languages. Many authors are simply happy to put their materials on their own websites. Our goal at this point is to elucidate some issues for those who want their materials to be more widely used and to gauge how many people might produce new materials if they had some sort of support. We see (at least) three topics for producers to consider: Making your materials available under a Creative Commons license: Many producers make their materials freely available on a website but do not include an explicit rights statement enabling third parties to make use of their work. This also prevents their work from having the impact that they often actually wish. There are various CC licenses to choose from. A CC-BY-ND-NC prevents anyone from modifying your work or using it for commercial purposes. Such a license is conservative and relatively easy to accept but a bolder approach, using a CC-BY-SA license, which allows for derivative works and for third-parties to include your work in a commercial service, makes it easier for your work to reach more people. The BY feature requires that you receive credit, while your original version can remain available as a point of reference. The SA feature means that anyone who modifies your work has to share the results — thus preventing a commercial enterprise from making a new version of what you have done and hiding it behind an exclusive subscription wall. Making your materials available in TEI XML:...

Medioevo Europeo: workshop summary

Summary of a workshop attended by Greta Franzini. Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. Photo of Florence Greta’s own. On Monday 28th April I attended a Cost Action workshop in Florence entitled  Towards a Medieval Latin Digital Library – A “Medioevo Europeo”. The workshop invited scholars from different countries and backgrounds to talk about their digital libraries and databases in an effort to better understand what’s available on the web today and, more importantly, how we can join forces to make our collections more useful and usable. The workshop was led by Professor Agostino Paravicini Bagliani, whose foreword introduced the Cost Action working group responsible for the promotion of the interoperability between Medieval databases and textual corpora. During the morning session each guest presented his/her own database so as to set the scene for the afternoon discussion, where participants defined next steps towards an international collaboration.   Clemens Radl (München), MGH Digital Clemens works on the Monumenta Germaniae Historica, a corpus whose development began in 1826. To date, it contains  400 volumes of medieval Latin text as well as other relevant materials, including middle-high French, Icelandic and Greek texts. The corpus is not limited to modern Germany but has a European scope, with texts dating from 500-1500. It features both digital critical editions and scans of the original volumes. MGH provides HTML versions of the texts, which do not enhance the text in any way but nevertheless provide a digital version of the text upon which further work can build. The HTML text contains a number of OCR errors, which the project is currently reviewing and correcting. MGH focuses more on layout rather...

CSEL is now on GitHub!

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. We’re really proud to announce that EpiDoc XML versions of the monumental Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum (CSEL) are now being added to the Open Greek and Latin Project‘s GitHub repository! We are in the process of digitising the public domain volumes of CSEL — you can the volumes with which we are beginning at http://www.roger-pearse.com/weblog/2009/10/24/list-of-csel-volumes-at-google-books/. The Latin text was OCR-ed, corrected (at 99% accuracy) and encoded according to our specifications by French Data Entry company Jouve. CSEL is the first in a line of texts Jouve is currently helping us digitise. Each XML file is available under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License and contains a link to the Archive.org scan it was taken from. An accuracy of 99% means that there are plenty of data entry errors to be fixed. Similarly, our basic CTS-compliant EpiDoc markup is waiting to be further enriched.  The raw text was annotated by operators with no knowledge of Latin nor Greek, so a lot can –and should– be done to improve the XML. So come and help us out! Feel free to download, modify, improve and share this work with friends and colleagues. The more, the merrier!    ...
Latin Data Entry

Latin Data Entry

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. The Open Greek and Latin Project (OGL) recently signed a contract with Data Entry Company Jouve to OCR and encode Latin works and collections in accordance with the latest TEI EpiDoc standards. First on the to-do list is the monumental Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum (CSEL) and, in particular, the public domain (by European Law) volumes available here: once digitised and annotated, OGL will make these volumes freely available online for browsing and download. The contract doesn’t stop at CSEL so we’re currently busy at work discussing other items on our to-do list. We look forward to a long and fruitful...