CSEL is now on GitHub!

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. We’re really proud to announce that EpiDoc XML versions of the monumental Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum (CSEL) are now being added to the Open Greek and Latin Project‘s GitHub repository! We are in the process of digitising the public domain volumes of CSEL — you can the volumes with which we are beginning at http://www.roger-pearse.com/weblog/2009/10/24/list-of-csel-volumes-at-google-books/. The Latin text was OCR-ed, corrected (at 99% accuracy) and encoded according to our specifications by French Data Entry company Jouve. CSEL is the first in a line of texts Jouve is currently helping us digitise. Each XML file is available under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License and contains a link to the Archive.org scan it was taken from. An accuracy of 99% means that there are plenty of data entry errors to be fixed. Similarly, our basic CTS-compliant EpiDoc markup is waiting to be further enriched.  The raw text was annotated by operators with no knowledge of Latin nor Greek, so a lot can –and should– be done to improve the XML. So come and help us out! Feel free to download, modify, improve and share this work with friends and colleagues. The more, the merrier!    ...
Latin Data Entry

Latin Data Entry

Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. The Open Greek and Latin Project (OGL) recently signed a contract with Data Entry Company Jouve to OCR and encode Latin works and collections in accordance with the latest TEI EpiDoc standards. First on the to-do list is the monumental Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum (CSEL) and, in particular, the public domain (by European Law) volumes available here: once digitised and annotated, OGL will make these volumes freely available online for browsing and download. The contract doesn’t stop at CSEL so we’re currently busy at work discussing other items on our to-do list. We look forward to a long and fruitful...

Publishing Text for a Digital Age

Announcement posted by Greta Franzini (not authored). March 27-30, 2014 Tufts University Medford MA perseus_neh (at) tufts.edu http://sites.tufts.edu/digitalagetext/2014-workshop/ Call for contributions! As a follow-on to Working with Text in a Digital Age, an NEH-funded Institute for Advanced Technologies in the Digital Humanities and in collaboration with the Open Philology Project at the University of Leipzig, Tufts University announces a two-day workshop on publishing textual data that is available under an open license, that is structured for machine analysis as well as human inspection, and that is in a format that can be preserved over time. The purpose of this workshop is to establish specific guidelines for digital publications that publish and/or annotate textual sources from the human record. The registration for the workshop will be free but space will be limited. Some support for travel and expenses will be available. We particularly encourage contributions from students and early-career researchers. Textual data can include digital versions of traditional critical editions and translations but such data also includes annotations that make traditional tasks (such as looking up or quoting a primary source) machine-actionable, annotations that may build upon print antecedents (e.g., dynamic indexes of places that can be used to generate maps and geospatial visualizations), and annotations that are only feasible in a digital space (such as alignments between source text and translation or exhaustive markup of morphology, syntax, and other linguistic features). Contributions can be of two kinds: Collections of textual data that conform to existing guidelines listed below. These collections must include a narrative description of their contents, how they were produced and what audiences and purposes they were designed to...