Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age ST Lee Professorial Fellow Lectures Spring 2016

Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age – ST Lee Professorial Fellow Lectures – Spring 2016 Gregory Crane Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Digital Humanities University of Leipzig Professor of Classics Winnick Family Chair of Technology and Entrepreneurship Tufts University A programme of lectures and events around the UK sponsored by the School of Advanced Study, University of London. Tuesday, May 17, 17:30-19:30, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House 349: “Global Philology, Greco-Roman Studies, and Classics in the 21st Century,” round table with Imre Galambos, Eleanor Robson, Sarah Savant and Michael Willis. Friday, May 20, 16:00-17:30, University of Glasgow: “Europe, Europeana and the Greco-Roman World.” Monday, May 23, 13:00-14:00: Oxford University Faculty of Classics, first floor seminar room, Epigraphy Workshop: “What are the possibilities for epigraphic (and papyrological) sources in a digital age?” Tuesday, May 24, 14:00-16:00, Oxford University: Seminar, Main lecture theatre, Faculty of Classics: “What would a smart edition look like and why should we care?” Friday, May 27, 12:00-13:30, University of Manchester: Seminar, “Greek into Arabic, Arabic into Latin, and reinterpretation of what constitutes Western Civilization.” Tuesday, May 31, 5.30-6.30, Durham University,seminar room, Dept. of Classics and Ancient History “Digital Philology and Greco-Roman Culture as the grand challenge of Reception Studies.” Friday, June 3, 16:30-18:00, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House 234: “Philological Education and Citizenship in the 21st Century.” Queries to...

Call for Papers: Classical Philology goes digital. Working on textual phenomena of ancient texts (Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017)

Call for papers Workshop Classical Philology goes digital. Working on textual phenomena of ancient texts. University of Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017 Digital technologies continue to change our daily lives, including the way scholars work. As a result, the Classics are currently also subject to constant change. Having established itself as an important field in the scientific landscape, Digital Humanities (DH) research provides a number of new possibilities to scholars who deal with analyses and interpretations of ancient works. Greek and Latin texts become digitally available and searchable (editing, encoding), they can be analyzed to find certain structures (text-mining), and they can also be provided with metadata (annotation, linking, textual alignment), e.g. according to traditional commentaries to explain terms, vocabulary or syntactic relationships (in particular tree-banking) for intra- and intertextual linking as well as for connections with research literature. Therefore, an important keyword in this is ‘networking,’ because there is so much potential for Classical Philology to collaborate with the Digital Humanities in creating useful tools for textual work, that a clear overview is difficult to obtain. Moreover, this scientific interest is by no means unilateral: Collaboration is very important for Digital Humanities as a way of (further) developing and testing digital methods. This is exactly where the proposed workshop comes in: representing several academic disciplines and institutions, scholars will come together to talk about their projects. We have invited Digital Humanists to the discussion who have experience pertaining to special issues in Classical Philology and can present the methods and potentials of their research (including the AvH Chair of DH / Leipzig, the CCeH, the DAI and Dariah-DE). In order to enable intensive and efficient work involving the various ideas and projects, the workshop is aimed at philologists whose...

Digital humanities enhanced. Challenges and prospects of Ancient Studies. A retrospect on the DH-conference in November 2015 in Leipzig

We are very happy to publish the report that Julia Jushaninowa has written about DHEgypt2015 (Altertumswissenschaften in a Digital Age: Egyptology, Papyrology and Beyond – Leipzig, November 4-6, 2015): Digital humanities enhanced. Challenges and prospects of Ancient Studies. A retrospect on the DH-conference in November 2015 in Leipzig by Julia Jushaninowa...

Join us for Sunoikisis DC 2015

Sunoikisis is a successful national consortium of Classics programs developed by the Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies. The goal is to extend Sunoikisis to a global audience and contribute to it with an international consortium of Digital Classics programs (Sunoikisis DC). Sunoikisis DC is based at the Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig. The aim is to offer collaborative courses that foster interdisciplinary paradigms of learning. Master students of both the humanities and computer science are welcome to join the courses and work together by contributing to digital classics projects in a collaborative environment. Sunoikisis DC will start in the SS 2015 with a Digital Classics course at the University of Leipzig. Faculty members of participating institutions will gather at the University of Leipzig on February 16-18 for a planning seminar in order to discuss course topics, schedule the academic calendar, and construct the course syllabus. The seminar is organized by the Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig in collaboration with the Center for Hellenic Studies and Perseids. Sunoikisis DC Planning Seminar 2015 February 16-18, 2015 (full program) Felix-Klein-Hörsaal (5. Etage) Paulinum, Hauptgebäude Universität Leipzig Augustusplatz 10-11 – 04109...

Near Eastern Studies and Historical Philologies in a Digital Age

Near Eastern Studies and Historical Philologies in a Digital Age December 8-9, 2014 University of Leipzig Paulinum, Augustusplatz [Preliminary Schedule for Public Presentations] http://tinyurl.com/qcdmh57 This workshop will follow-on a more extended four day conference on “Greek and Latin in an Age of Open Data,” (Dec. 1-4, 2014). This conference has been held in a hybrid format  that includes video-conferencing as well as face-to-face discussion. The discussions on Near Eastern Studies will build upon on-going conversations about not only a shift to a digital environment, but an accompanying shift to the exchange of open data, that is becoming prominent in Greco-Roman studies. Presentations will take place on the 5th floor of the Paulinum, Augustusplatz. Monday, December 8 (Felix Klein Hörsaal, Paulinum 501) 15:00-15:15: Welcome and Introduction 15.15-16.15 Gregory Crane: Introduction — What are the challenges and opportunities for historical philologies when scholarly information is produced and consumed in increasingly intelligent systems linked by increasingly powerful global networks? 16.15-17.15: Gernot Wilhelm: Hethitologie Portal Mainz 17.30-18.30: Steve Tinney: Digital Methods for the study of Cuneiform Languages Tuesday, December 9 (Paulinum 502) 9.00-10.00: Nathan Wasserman: The Sources of Early Akkadian Literature Project 10.15-11.15: Manfred Krebernik and Heiko Werwick: The Etymological Dictionary of Akkadian Project 11.30-12.30: Reinhard Foertsch: The IT Strategy of the DAI and the challenge of putting textual data in its archaeological...

Medioevo Europeo: workshop summary

Summary of a workshop attended by Greta Franzini. Authored and posted by Greta Franzini. Photo of Florence Greta’s own. On Monday 28th April I attended a Cost Action workshop in Florence entitled  Towards a Medieval Latin Digital Library – A “Medioevo Europeo”. The workshop invited scholars from different countries and backgrounds to talk about their digital libraries and databases in an effort to better understand what’s available on the web today and, more importantly, how we can join forces to make our collections more useful and usable. The workshop was led by Professor Agostino Paravicini Bagliani, whose foreword introduced the Cost Action working group responsible for the promotion of the interoperability between Medieval databases and textual corpora. During the morning session each guest presented his/her own database so as to set the scene for the afternoon discussion, where participants defined next steps towards an international collaboration.   Clemens Radl (München), MGH Digital Clemens works on the Monumenta Germaniae Historica, a corpus whose development began in 1826. To date, it contains  400 volumes of medieval Latin text as well as other relevant materials, including middle-high French, Icelandic and Greek texts. The corpus is not limited to modern Germany but has a European scope, with texts dating from 500-1500. It features both digital critical editions and scans of the original volumes. MGH provides HTML versions of the texts, which do not enhance the text in any way but nevertheless provide a digital version of the text upon which further work can build. The HTML text contains a number of OCR errors, which the project is currently reviewing and correcting. MGH focuses more on layout rather...