Open Greek and Latin workshop

This year’s European Summer School in Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig will offer an Open Greek and Latin workshop! The goal of the Open Greek and Latin workshop is to teach basic and advanced tools for dealing with Greek and Latin in a digital environment. Participants can attend both courses or just one of them according to their interests and needs. Block 1 (5 days = 16 hrs) EpiDoc and CTS/CITE Architecture (Monica Berti and Simona Stoyanova) This block will be devoted to introducing EpiDoc, which is a subset of the TEI XML standard for encoding scholarly and educational editions of ancient documents. Participants will learn to work with inscriptions and manuscripts, and a special focus will be given to print collections of fragmentary works. The block will also introduce the CTS/CITE Architecture for producing canonical references to ancient documents. Block 2 (5 days = 16 hrs) Linguistic annotations (Giuseppe Celano) The aim of this block is to introduce participants to linguistic annotations of ancient texts by learning how to encode the morphological, syntactic, and lexical information of sentences in Greek and Latin texts. The work will be based on the ancient languages dependency treebanks developed by the Perseus Project.   Come join...
iLatin and eGreek Conference – Ancient Languages and New Technologies

iLatin and eGreek Conference – Ancient Languages and New Technologies

Authored and posted by Emily Franzini. On 1st February the Open University in London hosted the iLatin and eGreek conference, a young and friendly gathering for those Classicists (most of us teachers, university professors or researchers) embracing the digital era and deciding that eLearning is not such a bad idea for those struggling with the declensions! James Robson and Mair Lloyd did a wonderful job of organising everything and between posh accents, tea and delicious chocolate biscuits the day flew by and interesting points were made. The speakers listed and explained some of the tools they have used, or even created, to help their students better understand and appreciate Latin and Greek and vocalised some of the problems they themselves face with financing their projects, making the material compelling and reaching students on a variety of platforms. It was general consensus that many universities in the UK urgently need to step up their game and introduce more modern Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) in order to cater for a growing number of students…yes, even in the Classics, would you believe...

Publishing Text for a Digital Age

Announcement posted by Greta Franzini (not authored). March 27-30, 2014 Tufts University Medford MA perseus_neh (at) tufts.edu http://sites.tufts.edu/digitalagetext/2014-workshop/ Call for contributions! As a follow-on to Working with Text in a Digital Age, an NEH-funded Institute for Advanced Technologies in the Digital Humanities and in collaboration with the Open Philology Project at the University of Leipzig, Tufts University announces a two-day workshop on publishing textual data that is available under an open license, that is structured for machine analysis as well as human inspection, and that is in a format that can be preserved over time. The purpose of this workshop is to establish specific guidelines for digital publications that publish and/or annotate textual sources from the human record. The registration for the workshop will be free but space will be limited. Some support for travel and expenses will be available. We particularly encourage contributions from students and early-career researchers. Textual data can include digital versions of traditional critical editions and translations but such data also includes annotations that make traditional tasks (such as looking up or quoting a primary source) machine-actionable, annotations that may build upon print antecedents (e.g., dynamic indexes of places that can be used to generate maps and geospatial visualizations), and annotations that are only feasible in a digital space (such as alignments between source text and translation or exhaustive markup of morphology, syntax, and other linguistic features). Contributions can be of two kinds: Collections of textual data that conform to existing guidelines listed below. These collections must include a narrative description of their contents, how they were produced and what audiences and purposes they were designed to...